Dear Black Americans 1

My fellow black Americans,

I am saddened that black people have accepted the fact that it is ok for most of us to be the last people. We have allowed society to convince us our homes need to be divided by removing our fathers all for the sake of welfare. We have allowed the education of most of our children to be diminished and accepted the ‘no child left behind’ narrative. Now in this time most of our children can not read, perform basic math problems, tie their shoes at a certain age, and sadly no discipline.

Black people, we have allowed society to take over and brain wash us as we continue to be the last while others rise further up to the top. We use to be a people of dignity and pride. We kept our homes clean, we owned the real estate in our communities, we had our own banks and medical facilities, we cared about how we dressed, we were in control of our own worship services, and we had our own schools. Now over the past 50 years or so we have given it all up to a society, an American society as if we have sold our very own souls out to the devil.

My fellow black people, all of our music use to have purpose, call ,and reason. Yet over the years, most of the music industry that involves our black people has demoralized each other and sexually exploited all women and we wonder what’s wrong with our children when our children are being raised by the hands of a black society with everything just mentioned and even worse.

Our Creator is furious with us and how we have laid down and accepted pure ignorance. My dear Black people, we can not keep blaming others when we bare our own responsibility for the negligence of ourselves. Most of our leaders, the very leaders we choose and vote for, publicly exploit their own people by advocating for us to stay impoverished by being owned by the government. Most of our leaders encourage us that we need the government to take care of us when we were a people who took care of ourselves. While most of society continues to encourage “our society” to depend on the government we are acceptably ignorant to the fact this is a major part of our problem. I am glad to say our culture has overcome forced enslavement, however, I am saddened to say black people have chosen to be voluntarily enslaved by the very society we live in yet and still with a low percentage success rate.

My fellow black people, stop following what society says and do what’s right for the people. Stop making excuses! It’s time to focus on progress without regression!

Balance & Gratitude

Balance and gratitude should play a part in all of our day to day living. Over the past few weeks I have been reminded by people, a lot of which are starting their own business, or already successfully operating businesses for themselves the importance of balance and gratitude. Keep in mind it’s important for us all not to lose site of those things and those people who should be most important starting with your creator and your family.

Time is so precious. We tend to treat time as if we have time but we don’t. This reminds me to encourage as many people as possible to always show appreciation to those who love you and those you love. People deserve appreciation, and all of us need to focus on balance. This world has shifted it’s culture and most people have conformed and accepted the ‘I still have time, We still have time,’ mentality when that is not so. Moving forward, Letha’s Real Talk will be presenting couples who made the decision to properly balance while building wealthy empires together. I appreciate those who have reminded me balance and appreciation matter.

Sometimes it’s a struggle, especially for those who really may not quite understand where they fit with those they have nurtured and supported so. I have come to the realization some may not appreciate their creator or even have families and these will be the very ones who will attempt to destroy the first gift creation gave us “family”. “When you lose site of who and what’s important you have become blinded to the realization that the mere existence of balance and gratitude is what allowed some of us to make it as far as we have, because of the support of those who have our best interest at heart.”

Thank you to those of you who do not mind letting the world know the importance of balance and most importantly those who encourage others to balance their family time, life, and gratitude properly.

De’Yara “Buttagoharder ” Hardy,

Meet De’Yara “Buttagoharder ” Hardy, from Dallas, Texas. She’s a branded, independent, Music Artist/Writer/Actor/Stylist/Brand Ambassador, with several years of experience. With over 58 music award nominations, and 10 wins, for all of her work, it’s safe to say that she is a force to reckon with. Buttagoharder is also a self stylist, self taught make up artist and CEO of her own entertainment company, “Doe Gurl Entertainment”. She’s the Texas Brand Ambassador for the “RReport Magazine”, originating from Georgia, which is currently on shelves in a Books-A-Million Store near you, as well as a brand ambassador for “Daco Clothing”, based out of Dallas, alongside “Billionaire’s Forever Brand” Clothing Company, based out of Hot Springs, Arkansas. She’s also the face of the S.E.A Awards, “Rough Feathers”, official clothing gear, highlighting her as “Internet Hustler of the Year” for 2020. Currently filming in a couple of Movies, you can expect to soon see Buttagoharder on a big screen near you. Search her music on all digital music platforms. Follow on all social media sites @Buttagoharder and stay connected on Www.Buttagoharder.com

Professionally,
Team Buttagoharder

Osborne Bell, Sr.

Osborne Bell Sr. was the first black Sheriff in Marshall County, MS and one of the first three black Sheriff’s to be sworn in- in the state of Mississippi. There is also a memorial marker just north of Hwy 4 on Hwy 309 south of Byhalia, MS marking the spot where Mr. Osborne was killed while on duty. Hwy 309 is also know as the Osborne Bell Highway. Osborne Bell was loved by many and is remembered for his friendliness and fairness to all. His political career began in 1967, when he was elected the first black coroner and served three terms as Marshall County Coroner (1967-1979). Osborne Bell was elected sheriff of Marshall County, Mississippi on November 6, 1979. He served his people with distinction. Sheriff Bell was a leader in law enforcement and in his community as well. He died in the line of duty on the morning of May 7, 1986.

Rest in Heaven Dear Uncle. I pray your legacy continues to live through us all.

Nikki Giovanni

Born Yolande Cornelia Giovanni. Jr, in Knoxville, Tennessee, Giovanni was the younger of two daughters in a close-knit family. She gained an intense appreciation for African American culture and heritage from her grandmother, explaining in an interview, “I come from a long line of storytellers.” This early exposure to the power of spoken language influenced Giovanni’s career as a poet, particularly her sophisticated use of vernacular speech. When Giovanni was a young child, she moved with her parents from Knoxville to a predominantly black suburb of Cincinnati, Ohio but remained close to her grandmother. Giovanni was encouraged by several schoolteachers and enrolled early at Fisk University, a prestigious HBCU (historically Black college or university) in Nashville, Tennessee. A literary and cultural renaissance was emerging at Fisk, as writers and other artists of color collaborated in cultural projects that explored and delineated the possibilities of Black identity.
Nikki Giovanni is one of America’s foremost poets. Over the course of a long career, Giovanni has published numerous collections of poetry—from her first self-published volume Black Feeling Black Talk (1968) to New York Times best-seller Bicycles: Love Poems (2009)—several works of nonfiction and children’s literature, and multiple recordings, including the Emmy-award nominated The Nikki Giovanni Poetry Collection (2004). Her most recent publications include Make Me Rain: Poems and Prose (2020), Chasing Utopia: A Hybrid (2013) and, as editor, The 100 Best African American Poems (2010). A frequent lecturer and reader, Giovanni has taught at Rutgers University, Ohio State University, and Virginia Tech, where she is a University Distinguished Professor.

Born Yolande Cornelia Giovanni. Jr, in Knoxville, Tennessee, Giovanni was the younger of two daughters in a close-knit family. She gained an intense appreciation for African American culture and heritage from her grandmother, explaining in an interview, “I come from a long line of storytellers.” This early exposure to the power of spoken language influenced Giovanni’s career as a poet, particularly her sophisticated use of vernacular speech. When Giovanni was a young child, she moved with her parents from Knoxville to a predominantly black suburb of Cincinnati, Ohio but remained close to her grandmother. Giovanni was encouraged by several schoolteachers and enrolled early at Fisk University, a prestigious HBCU (historically Black college or university) in Nashville, Tennessee. A literary and cultural renaissance was emerging at Fisk, as writers and other artists of color collaborated in cultural projects that explored and delineated the possibilities of Black identity.
Giovanni’s first published volumes of poetry grew out of her response to the assassinations of such figures as Martin Luther King, Jr., Malcolm X, Medgar Evers, and Robert Kennedy, and the pressing need she saw to raise awareness of the plight and the rights of Black people. Black Feeling Black Talk (1968) and Black Judgement (1968) explore Giovanni’s growing political and spiritual awareness. These early books, followed by Re: Creation (1970), quickly established Giovanni as a prominent new voice in African American literature. Black Feeling Black Talk sold over ten thousand copies in its first year alone.She publicly expressed feelings of oppression, anger, and frustration; in doing so, she found new audiences beyond the usual poetry-reading public.